Total War: Attila

Battlefield Hardline

Homeworld Remastered

There Came an Echo

Warhammer 40K: Regicide is Battle Chess with Chainswords

NextPrev

 

Total War: Attila

In the northern reaches of The european union, the small barbarian kingdoms teeter between oblivion and effectiveness. To the south, the migratory tribes lie in turmoil; the Alans have grown tired of the other tribes poking fun at their name and now rage against the world with a ferocity that wins them few friends but many battles. They also bring with them tough leadership challenges, although there are numerous paths to victory and each faction boasts unique strengths to help get them there.In order to balance the hungry expansion of a developing kingdom with the necessity of moving beyond static stone walls to leverage the strengths of a mobile horde, decisions must be made.

In the Eastern Empire of the Sassanids, things are quieter and life is undeniably easier. Still, this prosperous and enlightened empire must contend with petty Roman leaders who grasp at their exotic riches to help prop up a faltering regime. As a fractured and fractious beast, even though the great Roman Empire itself still stands. The division of West and East has resulted in huge swathes of empire left in disrepair, defended by ill-equipped and unmotivated soldiers who can be tempted away by promises of glory and freedom. What goes up must come down and those who spent weeks building their empire in Total War: Rome 2 can spend just as long trying to prevent its fall.

Read more Comments

The Order: 1886

In video games, the term 'cinematic' can cut both ways. It speaks of the grand sweep of Naughty Dog's Uncharted, where players are rinsed away in the tightly scripted matinee-idol measures of Nathan Drake. It speaks, too, of the frictions that have existed since this sort of lavishly animated Laser Disc adventures as Dragon's Lair and Space Ace, exactly where players are pushed to the sidelines as the spectacle unfurls before them, asking for only occasional minor prompts.

All set at Dawn's The Order: 1886, the first original home gaming system game from a studio that made its name with portable versions of Sony's God of War, cuts a curious line in between both concepts of cinematic gaming, finding shaky new ground between the choreographed taking pictures of Uncharted and the a lot more prescribed, cut-picture-laden drama of Heavy Rain. The motion never clicks and its dramatics fall consistently flat - but the spectacle they are slave to is unquestionably stirring.

Read more Comments

 

Homeworld Remastered

What's been so frustrating about the Homeworld games isn't that a few people never quite received them, it's that for over a decade no-one particular has been able to get them by any means, period. In spite of the ease which PC titles have been distributed and sold since Steam first launched , it seems absurd that such a universally acclaimed series has taken this long to reappear. That the games, sans Cataclysm, are at last available in HD form has almost made the wait worthwhile.

Given than an entire generation of gamers has grown up without knowing or experiencing Homeworld, it's perhaps necessary to explain the appeal of the originals, which apart from being perhaps the first games to properly tackle the issues of controlling multiple units in a 3D space, managed to offer up one of the most compelling and satisfying storylines any strategy title had ever managed before - or indeed has managed since. Before such a thing was even a glint in Ronald D, a reimagining of Battlestar Galactica. Moore's eye, Homeworld follows a civilisation in search of its ancient homeworld, of course while being pursued by a ruthless foe. Without giving too much away for the sequel, it isn't long after the Home Sweet Home signs are nailed above the fireplace that extinction threatens humanity once again.

Read more Comments